Nikita Polyakov

Past Windows Phone Dev Microsoft MVP | Author | Speaker | Organizer | @NikitaP

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Since I am currently in college[let's not get into that] - and I get asked from the professional world on almost weekly basis - we need great developers that want to learn and grow their knowledge. My usual response, good luck. I am baffled by how difficult it will be in few years for the company I own to get few interns to help out whit my dev and admin work that my company does. Mind you that finding a person in college that wants to learn AD and windows networks is a bored “Linux/Unix drop-out” who is just really really bored with his current environment, and even those few are just into this to play around and not interested in a job. Same with .NET developers and anyone that know anything about real web development, those are just not tough in schools.

So here is a link to a great article by Joel on his Blog - http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/FindingGreatDevelopers.html

Here is an exert that I can relate to:

“But for the most part, great developers (and this is almost a tautology) are, uh, great, (ok, it is a tautology), and, usually, prospective employers recognize their greatness quickly, which means, basically, they get to work wherever they want, so they honestly don’t send out a lot of resumes or apply for a lot of jobs.“

And this:

“The corollary of that rule—the rule that the great people are never on the market—is that the bad people—the seriously unqualified—are on the market quite a lot. “

And this:

“One good way to snag the great people who are never on the job market is to get them before they even realize there is a job market: when they’re in college.“

If you are a great consultant, and if you are - you should be thinking about getting a nicely set job or starting your own gig with few other people - where to get those people [and how much will they cost] is one of the biggest problems for me as I look forward.

I recommend this read, even though it's a a bit longer then I expected and then you might want to read. You can skip the part about how FogCreek does their internships and come back to it later, because it's kinda cool. I started writing this Blog when I was 1/3 of the way into this article, it was that good!

posted on Friday, September 8, 2006 11:41 AM