Quality

With my new job, I’ve not been able to take advantage of a lot of Agile/XP practices. In a company of four, where each is effectively working on a different project, collaboration is minimal. Also, for the projects that I am working on, the customer is very adamant about getting a detailed proposal up front, including a list of all of the screens and how they will operate. I’ve managed to get by without too much detail, but it is still more than I am generally comfortable with. TDD and Continuous ......
I encountered a repeatable crash in VS2008 for the first time today. I was working on a C# file in the editor. SP1 added some design time hints on syntax or potential compile time problems. The code I was working on had a few red squiggly lines letting me know that I should correct something. Well, when I tried to edit one particular line, VS would freeze on me then throw a nice "Sorry, I'm crashing" error dialog and then close. VS has crashed on me before, but that has typically been because something ......
Recently, the CEO of Sprint could be seen in TV commercials stating "Technology is only great when you know how to use it." Here is an article that digs a little deeper into this ad campaign. The purpose of the campaign is to highlight Sprint's customer service, which of course is vitally important to any company providing products or services. I am not here to criticize Sprint. In fact, if you read the article, you will see that they are addressing technology simplicity as well as customer service. ......
Whoa! Why does it need fixing if it is not broken? I'd like to explore the definition of "broken". Here is a modest list of signs of broken code. A test is failing (I know, painfully obvious) The code doesn't do what the user expects. (Likely, you actually have a broken test or it's missing altogether.) The code is hard to read, hard to enhance and brittle. I think the first two bullets are obvious and the customer will see the value in fixing the code. The final bullet leads us to refactoring. How ......
In the application I've been working on, we have the requirement to handle unique constraint errors gracefully. It wasn't really hard, I just had to check for OracleException.Code == 1. The trick was the testing. Testing a unique constraint error was not a problem. The issue is verifying that other exceptions are bubbled up properly. The basic exception handling code is like this: 1 protected bool HasUniqueConstraintError( Action databaseAction ) 2 { 3 try 4 { 5 databaseAction(); 6 return false; ......
Last month was a busy month for me. We deployed the first version (beta) of the product I have been working on over the last couple of months. Meeting the deadline with all of the promised features (almost) was critical. However, when you fix the time line and fix the feature set, then something else has got to give. You guessed it, quality. Quality is not just a concern over failures. There is a level of quality in your successes as well. So far, the feedback on the product has been very positive, ......