Tag | Development Posts

While commuting home today, I started thinking about the future of DirectX. I suppose this is kind of in relation to Tom Miller's request for future improvements to DirectX. First of all, when most teams at Microsoft are starting up blogs, where are all the DirectXers? The only one I am familiar with is Tom Miller, am I missing some? Not only the lack of bloggers, but also the lack of community. Microsoft's community support for DirectX definitely leaves many things to be desired. While there is ...
Hey everybody. I will be doing a series of articles on this blog about developing games with DirectX9 and C#. The first series of articles will be on developing a simple 2d game (the game that I briefly mentioned in a prior post). You can see the articles by choosing the Game Development link “Writing a 2d game with Managed DirectX” on the left of my blog or simply bookmark the following post. I will be updating that post as I put up new articles. The first article is up. I am thinking ...
I am not really sure if I've posted anything on this topic before. I feel like I have, but if so I couldnt find the post in the archive. So I am risking a second post. However I did asked a similar question up on the sharepoint newsgroup some time back.Over the past few months my team has been building an intranet application based on SharePoint. We've basically being rolling out our own custom WebParts.Whats very odd about managing a WebPart development project is that, versioning is a pain.To increment ...
DreamFactory Software accelerates the rapid construction of rich client user interfaces for enterprise web applications powered by XML documents and web services. This standards-based approach streamlines design, enhances user experience, reduces network traffic, and dramatically lowers development costs. Companies such as salesforce.com and Grand Central Communications use DreamFactory to build dynamic browser-based environments that enable their end users to create custom applications with web ...
I know this is my second article today about the same thing but I really can't stress enough how cool I think the idea behind WinFS is. With WinFS you can take disparate stores of information, such as MSN Messenger contacts and Outlook contacts, and share them across all applications in Longhorn. However, since third party applications, like Lotus and other email and collaboration applications, will not be designed to take advantage of these new features, many people think that the real purpose of ...
Here is an interesting interview with Bruce Perens on how the SCO isn't a big deal anymore, but the threat to Linux and all development beyond the major vendors is software patents and the screwed up nature in which the U.S. Patent Office issues these things. Right to the punch, a quote that really says it all is: “You have to consider engineers today spend their entire careers combining other people's intellectual property. And every small and medium sized enterprise is at risk regarding software ...
Ever wondered how vs.net 2003 is able to find out when you open a project whether or not your IIS configuration supports v1.1 of asp.net Well this is how. when you open a project in vs.net it starts talking to the web server and sets up your vswebcache folder which is otherwise used for your offline development in case the dev IIS server is not localhost It actually calls a magic file "Get_aspx_ver.aspx" from the web server. It does not matter whether your application has this file or not. But it ...
AITF was a success! Juval Löwy, Michael Wheaton, and Dan Malks came and spoke to a group of developers and managers, and they all loved it. This forum was more focused on software development than I'd like for the future, but I had to minimize the scope because of other things going on at work. I must say that if you haven't experienced one of Juval's talks, you're missing out. Juval is very eccentric and opinionated, which is always a good thing in my book. He's worked with Microsoft on a number ...

I have webhosting with WebHost4Life, which has been great. But I can't seem to access the HttpApplication object with the Global.asax, like unhandled Errors. The events don't fire. I figure it is because IIS doesn't have my root folder as an Application, but I've messed with that with no avail. And of course it works on my development box...

Doing a little research online didn't find anything.

Anyone else had this problem with their Global.asax?

In InfoPath, every control on the form must be bound to an element in the XML document and defined by the underlying schema. This can be limiting when you want to provide some additional assistance to retrieve information and/or populate the form. One option is to use managed code that displays System.Windows.Forms dialogs launched by a button on the form. This comes at a cost of making development and deployment more complicated. Another option is to use a Custom Task Pane. A Custom Task Pane in ...
The Next User Group Meeting is scheduled to be held on 16-Jan-2004 Timings: 6:30 PMVenue: Intelligroup OfficeEvery one is welcome to the meeting and I request members to pass on this message to as many people as possible.1) Welcome Note - 5 mins, By Jaffer2)Introduction to Biztalk Server 2004 - 30 minutes, By K. Shiva, Visual Soft TechnologiesBiztalk Server 2004 connects systems, people, and trading partners through manageable business processes. This session will provide an overview of the many ...
While working on the ESF spec, Jeff started using Groove and turned me onto it as well. I can say I don't know how I ever did distributed projects without it. Groove is amazing. It makes doc sharing super easy and communication with your team a snap. I liked it so much that we are starting to use it for our INETA development projects. I just uploaded all of my specs and started setting up development tasks. If you doing development with a distributed team, I highly recommend going and downloading ...
Thank you to all of those who emailed me inquiring about INETA development projects. If you emailed me and I never responed, I apologize. You email probably got lost in the flood. Please shoot me another email and I will contact you. INETA is still looking for volunteer developers to help us create our next website. If your interested and have some free hours, you can get more information from www.ineta.org/developers/ ...
Got some extra cycles? INETA is looking for volunteer developers to help us craft our next generation website. We are writing in ASP.NET and C#, and all docs and communication will be done in English. If your interested and have ASP.NET development experience and are willing to devote some time to a good cause, please contact me at devin.rader@ineta.org UPDATE: I created a new subject in the INETA forums for developers to comunicate. You will have to register on the INETA website, then email me and ...
Ok OK its been a long time since I could blog or even check my blog roll. Seems like things will never cease to become less hectic. Today we folks fellow enthusiasts from the Hyderabad dotnet user group [ Microsoft user group hyderabad ] (should call it MUGHYD read MUG Head) sat down and prepared a plan for the next user group session on the 19th of this month (every 3rd friday of the month the user group meets). This is the D-Day when we shall formally be launching MugHyd. Enough of the waiting ...
Maybe I'm just in the dark (haha...get it? Eclipse...in the dark), but I just found out that Eclipse, IBM's open source J2 IDE, was given its moniker to symbolize its intent to overshadow Sun's own open source development tool, NetBeans. Well, that's what Sun officials claim, anyway. Personally, I like this sort of thing. I'd liek to see more of it, as a matter of fact. Here are a few of my ideas... Sun Block Sun Screen Sun Shade Visual Studio .NET SPF 120 (hehe) This all came about when IBM started ...
So, I got in a discussion (read: argument) with someone about scalability, right. It all started when a manager made a comment, “.NET isn't as scalable as J2EE.” I of course rebutted by claiming that this was an ignorant statement. Then, a more technical person on this guy's team made the comment, as if it would be any less ignorant. To prove my point, I asked the techie how comparable .NET and J2EE apps would scale considering a Windows-based platform. He proceeded to say that they would ...
Keith Pleas talks about a few VB issues in a recent blog post. He points out that most VB developers are RAD-centric and C# developers are code-centric. I agree with this 100%...and I know Microsoft does, too. He also mentions the move of old VB6 developers to .NET: “...return of the VB programmer who glued together a bunch of stuff...” I think that this is the essence of VB. And, I also think this is why VB has so many problems gaining respect among users of more complex languages. Let's ...
I'm looking for a good name for a software development conference-summit-forum-thing. This is an internal event to help share information as well as bring in good people to talk about software issues/innovations. Does anyone have any suggestions? Here are some of the ideas I've been mulling over: Application Development Forum (ADF) Applied Technology Forum (ATF) Applied Information Technology Forum (AITF or “8F”) Information Technology Forum (ITF) Software Development Forum (SDF) Software ...
Risk: Personnel shortfalls Mitigation: Bring on a skilled core team. Have the team mentor new people. Make training and teamwork part of the culture. Hire top-notch personnel while the market remains soft. Risk: Misalignment with business goals Mitigation: Align developments with business goals and highlight importance of development. Risk: Unrealistic customer and schedule expectations Mitigation: Make the customer part of the team. Set schedule goals around frequent deliveries of varying functionality. ...
There seems to be one topic in the .NET community that usually gets a lot of responses and can sometimes turn into an ugly debate. It’s the question – which language should I program in? Some folks choose one language and stick with it. Some are forced to choose two, because their job demands it. Though, no matter how many programming languages one uses though, they usually turn to a tried and try favorite and primarily use this one for their development purposes. When it comes to .NET languages, ...
FINALLY! I got a machine together - not all the parts I wanted - but good enough to get Longhorn on it. Final piece was the DVD drive. I did a clean install of Longhorn. I was quite interested in how the install process would proceed. So I will detail it out as much as I can for those people that are strange and love these details (like me). First off, there was no blue install screen where you would see the default drivers and such being installed. The first things requested was a page where I had ...
Well, I thought I would just do a quick post on my initial thoughts on Longhorn. Please keep in mind that I just installed Longhorn so I don't have much experience with it yet. First of all, even without the true Aero experience, it is still quite a handsome operating system. The install went without a hitch. The total install only took around 30 minutes (I installed directly on the box). A couple little cool things that I noticed to this point that I look forward to exploring more in the future: ...
I started to read an article that was talking about how simplicity always wins over complexity. This was followed up by a statement about the up-and-coming "feature race." This just made me think about Longhorn, Microsoft's next version of Windows. What are we going to do when it comes out? I haven't seen all of the content released after PDC, yet, but I don't think Microsoft will leave us all hanging with our "legacy" Win32/NTFS apps. When considering Linux and MacOS, I would have to say that both ...
Jon Udell recently wrote an article about "rich" GUI's. In this, he covers a good amount of ideas that I've been thinking of for a while. If you get a chance, go check it out. I'm not sure what everyone else thinks about this, but Microsoft is re-focusing on desktop applications. I've talked to a lot of people about this, and it seems that the majority of people want to stick with what they're used to - whether it be desktop or web apps. I've done development for both platforms, and personally, I ...
I don't mean to pick on anybody in particular, but I think most developers share this concern: deprecation of functionality. I'm sure that everyone who's been in the software development business for a few years has had to deal with this in one form or another. The reason I wanted to talk about this now is because of the up-and-coming Java Server Faces (JSF) release. And, while I recognize that this isn't necessarily a deprecation of functionality from a Java standpoint, the open source community ...
Well, 10503 to be exact. This is great, with the site being live for a month now. I just want to thank all the great bloggers on this site. We have 28 blogs, and more are welcome. I would like to ask you to find a friend and get them into blogging. With all the Post-PDC buzz around the future of development with Microsoft tools, now is the best time to get involved. Also, bring that friend to your next local .NET user group meeting. Technorati Tags: Geekswithblogs ...
I don't know if anyone out there is even reading this blog yet, but I was a little curious about the development environment that any of you develop in. My environment looks like the following IDE: Visual Studio .NET 2003 SQL: Sql Server 2000 [Corrected. Thanks Carlos!] Testing: NUnit Build Tool: NAnt / NAntPad Source Control: Subversion (an open-source cvs-style app) Language Preference: C# OS: Windows XP Pro How 'bout you ...
There is a great article on MSDN about building distributed applications in .NET. It's a six parter, mainly focused on using a service-oriented architecture. It is definitely not light reading, especially considering it is around 228 printed pages long. From what I can tell, it goes into great detail when dealing with the architecture of the system. The article even covers issues with legacy systems and application maintenance/deployment. I will try to post a little better review of the article once ...
“Testing is the process of demonstrating that defects are not present in the application that was developed.” “Testing is the activity or process which shows or demonstrates that a program or system performs all intended functions correctly.” “Testing is the activity of establishing the necessary “confidence” that a program or system does what it is supposed to do, based on the set of requirements that the user has specified.” These myths are still ...
Risk avoidance: Risk is avoided by obviating the possibility that the undesirable event will happen. You refuse to commit to meeting milestone M by feature F - don't sign the contract until the software is done. This avoids the risk. As long as you enter into the contract to deliver specific scope by a specific date, the risk that it won't come about exists.Risk reduction: this consists of minimizing the likelihood of the undesirable event. XP reduces the likelihood that you will lack some features ...
1. Customer satisfaction index (Quality ultimately is measured in terms of customer satisfaction.) Surveyed before product delivery and after product delivery (and on-going on a periodic basis, using standard questionnaires) Number of system enhancement requests per year Number of maintenance fix requests per year User friendliness: call volume to customer service hotline User friendliness: training time per new user Number of product recalls or fix releases (software vendors) Number of production ...
Naive stage of Grid computing: For feature list of Oracle grid computing: look into the link http://geekswithblogs.net/b... Philip Brittan, co-founder and chairman of Droplets has his words on Grid computing: Big platform vendors such as IBM, Sun Microsystems, Oracle and Hewlett-Packard are promoting the panacea of "grid" and "utility" computing. With grid and utility computing, the major vendors are describing the natural next step in the evolution of IT, and there seems to be ...
Microsoft's Command-Line Compiler You do not need to buy Visual Studio .NET in order to program in C#. On the Windows platform, you can do everything with a text editor and the C# command-line tools that are provided in the Platform SDK(130MB) Mono Mono is an effort to make an Open Source implementation of the .NET Development Framework and includes a free C# compiler DotGNU Portable.NET A British-based Open Source implementation of the .NET Development Framework targeting Linux, includes C# compiler ...
Second day keynote …. In the beginning, there was a video of attendees. The most exciting part was Donny Mack and Asli talking about Indigo being the stuff in your watches to make them glow. They were shown in their shades and holding their little dog! Quite groovy guys! Notes on Eric Rudder Keynote: What Microsoft hears from you: Don’t make me rewrite everything! Moving code from development to production is too hard Give me more code samples … in my favorite language Help me make ...
The definition of the term quality is an issue. Based interesting discussion of the meaning of Quality, a surprising number of people still think software quality is simply the absence of errors. Dictionary definitions are too vague to be of much help. The only relevant definition offered by the Oxford English Dictionary (Oxford, 1993), for instance, is peculiar excellence or superiority. Noteworthy here is that quality cannot be discussed for something in isolation: comparison is intrinsic. Many ...
What Does Quality Cost? The title of Phil Crosby book says it all: Quality Is Free. Why is quality free? Like Crosby and J.M. Juran, Jim Campenella also illustrates a technique for analyzing the costs of quality in Principles of Quality Costs. Campenella breaks down those costs as follows: Cost of Quality = Cost of conformance + Cost of nonconformance Conformance Costs include Prevention Costs and Appraisal Costs. Prevention costs include money spent on quality assurance tasks like training, requirements ...
Jim Alchin - ** how developers can do this? Fundamentals - WinFS - Indigo - Avalon Announcing WinFX - next step behind Win 32 - builds on the .NET Framework Well-structured programming framework for Windows Continued commitment to back wards compatibility MS-DOS – Win16 – Win32 - WinFX Add ref and release you will not have to think about. WinFx Developer Preview - namespace chart Software fundamentals - challenges System, application, driver reliability Deployment complexity and expense ...
Avalon: Best of the Web, Best of Windows Bringing together the advantages from both worlds Web Seamless deployment, update and administration flowable layout progressive download and rendering Declarative model Windows Unrestricted functionality Integration with Windows desktop Good offline support Scalability and performance Broad developer language Developer Experience Declarative Programming Extensible Application Markup – codenamed XAML One to one correspondence with object model Key role ...
ASP.NET Whidbey Themes Developer productivity Reduce ASP.NET V1-V2 lines of code by 2/3rds Enable rich scenarios not easily possible today Administration and Management Easiest platform to manage and administer Totally Extensible Platform Replace/extend all built-in features + services Customize for any enterprise environment Performance and scalability The world’s fastest web application server Runs on a 64-bit server ASP.NET 2.0 Developer Stack New ASP.NET Building block APIs Membership. ...