Terje Sandstrom

------ Visual Studio ALM MVP -----

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November 2008 Entries

I like Code Metrics. They give a certain "objective" evaluation of a piece of code. You can use it for yourself just to make it pinpoint potential trouble areas, or just some code where you were a bit sloppy - happens from time to time...... And when you're going to do a peer review, it's much better to point to some numbers instead of the "This code sucks....."-thing. So when it finally arrived inside Visual Studio I was delighted. There are however a few things there which should be nice candidates ......

When I do either Code Analysis, Code Metrics or looking at Code Coverage results, I don't want to have any generated code affecting the results. It just confuses the numbers, and I do not really care how generated code looks - it should just be invisible. Generated code appears several places, code is generated by any of the multitude of wizards and designers in Visual Studio, or it may be generated by a 3rd part tool or generated by a self-written tool. There exist an attribute which, if attached ......

I did an article on Subsystem branching (http://geekswithblogs.net/... as a result of a post on the Microsoft forums regarding this. Further, at the PDC 2008 conference now, Grant Holliday made me aware of the TFS Dependency Replicator, which also is a way to solve the problem. It corresponds to the solution I named Solution 3B, however, it's not using the branch/merge facilities, so the TFS itself is not "aware" of the file copied. Anyway, ......