Tag | Software development Posts

Note: This was originally chapter 13 of my book, UML Applied: A .NET Perspective from Apress. My editor and my tech reviewer read it; and both said, "We like it; but what does it have to do with UML?" So I came up with a more on-topic closing chapter. But I still like it. It sums up my view of the software development profession quite nicely. So I thought I would share it here. Somewhere, deep in our prehistory... A man tells a story, a story of a hunt. Perhaps it's a hunt he's planning. Or perhaps ...
Inspired by Steve Ballmer, here's some cheerleading for the most important part of the software development process... UPDATE: Here's a larger, more legible WMV version. Once upon a time, I wrote a book. Or rather, I wrote all but one-half of chapter 3 of a book: Requirements Patterns & AntiPatterns, sold to Addison-Wesley. For various reasons -- partly lost motivation when my Dad died, partly needing to put food on the table, partly just not finding time -- I've never been able to finish chapter ...
Process is a lie. All of it. If you're spitting and fuming because you believe in software development processes, bear with me. I have a point to make, and you'll enjoy it. If you've never believed in software development processes and you're cheering me on, take a seat and a deep breath. I have a point to make, and you're not gonna like it. But you need to hear it. Process is a Lie? Process is a lie, because process is a plan for how we'll work. And plans are lies. All of them. A plan says, "This ...
AT ONE TIME the Horse had the plain entirely to himself. Then a Stag intruded into his domain and shared his pasture. The Horse, desiring to revenge himself on the stranger, asked a man if he were willing to help him in punishing the Stag. The man replied that if the Horse would receive a bit in his mouth and agree to carry him, he would contrive effective weapons against the Stag. The Horse consented and allowed the man to mount him. From that hour he found that instead of obtaining revenge on the ...
2500 years ago, a man named Aesop gathered the accumulated software development knowledge of the ancient Greeks, and presented the knowledge to history. However, since so few people in the intervening millennia knew anything about software, they misinterpreted Aesop's lessons as simple morality fables, rather than as hard advice for software managers. Now you can learn what Aesop had to teach us about software development processes and management. The pioneering programmer known as Aesop is still ...
(Reposted from Agile Summer Camp. The team will edit and improve that version, filling in the gaps in my memory and understanding. This is my rough draft.) Organized by Chris Woodruff with the able assistance of Josh Holmes and Michael Eaton, Agile Summer Camp 2008 was a fantastic success. This is an Agile Summer Camp Diary, documenting bits and pieces of a fun, rich, informative weekend with a crowd of unwashed geeks. No text page (nor even sadukie's great pictures) can capture the full experience ...
At the recent PDC in LA I had the opportunity to speak to some of the C# team. I tried to make the most of this by voicing one of my biggest bugbears with the C# language: Why make numbers so overly difficult to use? We have sbyte, byte, short, ushort, int, unit, long, ulong, float, double, decimal to represent the simple real world concept of a number. If we take the concept of a number into the software development paradigm what do we really want from it: Fidelity (How many decimal places to we ...
Windows 7 These past couple of weeks have been a mixture of fortunes for me; I was fortunate enough to be sent by my employer to the PDC in LA where I won a couple of iPod Touches This also enable me to sign up to the Mesh developers program which I'll blog about later. Unfortunately my fortunes took a turn for the worse at the end of the week when an investor pulled out of our company forcing the board to shut down the development department leaving me out of a job. So I'm going to try and make ...
Its very tough to get into every possible part of modern software development process :- Debugging, Testing, Building, performance Optimization etc. Pardon me for skipping some sub-processes. But I was never hyper-aware about performance issues and It was always an afterthought of development process. But in the last couple of weeks I was continuously cracking my head in subtle issues related to performance optimization. For example when I am profiling a piece of test-case code for a database driver ...
For those of you like me who missed PDC (though I did watch the streaming video as time permitted!) you can now catch some of the PDC content live at an event near you with MSDN Developer Conference. I'm going to try to head to the Atlanta one on December 16th. More details below as seen in Brian's blog: The Speakers Chad Brooks Jeff W. Barnes Wally McClure Glen Gordon Mark Dunn Steve Porter Murray Gordon Todd Fine Jim Wooley Brian Hitney Keith Rome Todd Miranda Dave Scruggs Shawn Wildermuth Mickey ...
As a standard, we use ClickOnce to deploy all of our applications. I don't want to get into all the benefits as I have discussed some in a previous post. To summarize my scenario, I do software development for a 24 x 7 x 365 manufacturing plant. Our systems must always be online and we must provide after hours support. This week, one of our developers deployed an update to his end users. It was not until 7 PM that the end user determined there was a significant bug in the application that could cause ...
If you haven’t already checked it out, it’s definitely worth a look at the new design for geekswithblogs.net. The new design brings a bit of a “hipper” aspect to the scene, and we all know how blogging about software development deserves to be hip :) Check out the updated look: http://www.geekswithblogs.net Technorati Tags: GWB,GeeksWithBlogs 3.0 ...
Recently, the CEO of Sprint could be seen in TV commercials stating "Technology is only great when you know how to use it." Here is an article that digs a little deeper into this ad campaign. The purpose of the campaign is to highlight Sprint's customer service, which of course is vitally important to any company providing products or services. I am not here to criticize Sprint. In fact, if you read the article, you will see that they are addressing technology simplicity as well as customer service. ...
Capsule Review of More Effective C#: 50 Specific Ways to Improve Your C# by Bill Wagner I really found Bill's previous book (Effective C#: 50 Specific Ways to Improve Your C# (Effective Software Development Series)) very useful. I've recommended in many classes I've taught and also to clients while consulting. More Effective C# enhances the original with C# 3.0 and LINQ additions. Bottom line: If you want to be a serious developer that continually hones his (or her) craft, then you need this book. ...
I've known Kirstin pretty much since she came to Magenic, and she's one of the smartest (and most energetic) people I know. Shortly after joining our team, she was off and running and hasn't slowed down yet. Through dogged persistence (and a few emails), I was able to keep up with her long enough to ask her these NINE Questions: 1. Where are you from? St. Paul/Minneapolis, MN. I had a brief stint in Silicon Valley right at the beginning of the tech bubble – that was cool! Got home-sick though. 2. ...
I decided to completely redesign my website www.galasoft.ch (yes, it's about time, I know). For this process, I decided to inspire myself (loosely) from my good friend Robby Ingebretsen's site, which is both simple and beautiful. Read the rest of this entry » ...
Links showing tools to help make development and/or administration of WSS 3.0 and/or MOSS 2007 easier Katrien's About .NET Blog Windows SharePoint Services 3.0: Software Development Kit (SDK) http://www.microsoft.com/do... ...
It’s that time of year again for my company. The decision has to be made on renewing my MSDN subscription. Actually it’s been two years since I made that decision as the last time I renewed my MSDN Universal became a Visual Studio Team System for Software Developers with Premium MSDN subscription (thank you, Redmond marketing department), purchased as a two year eOpen license. In my cash flow projections for my company, I have roughly £1,000 + VAT pencilled in for my MSDN license. It hurts a bit, ...

If you're in the Bristol area and want to hear a real software development pro speak about writing software fit to publish, then get along to the DotNetDevNet .NET user group on Monday the 13th of October.

Oren Eini (a.k.a. Ayende Rahien) is coming to town!

I’ve been doing development professionally now for maybe 18 months and my experiences over the last 8 months in an agile shop have made me realise just how much there is to know in the development arena and, more importantly, how much I would like to know in order to be really creative in my job and produce truly excellent software. In my previous job, I used a text editor to write Perl. There was no such thing as unit testing and copying and pasting was viewed as an aid to productivity rather than ...
“Has Software Development Gotten Easier Over the Past 30 Years?” To most people that sounds like a ridiculous question; nearly everyone will immediately answer “Of Course It Has!”. But is this really the case? Sure, machines today have capabilities that were unimaginable just a few years ago. New software languages and tools provide the ability to quickly produce applications that were considered “Science Fiction” at the start of the current decade. The detailed knowledge that was required has largely ...
Hello, I'm Svetlin Ralchev from Bulgaria, but now living in London, United Kingdom. This year I grauated from University of Sofia. I studied Informatics and moved here in London, where I want to work. Now I'm in process of looking for new job. If you're looking for C# Developer, just contact me. This will be my blog, which will be related with my job as software developer. Here I'll share my experience in software development (everything related with Microsoft .NET Framework and design patterns) ...
Tonight I met with Cody Marx Bailey, Roby Fitzhenry, Stephanie Leary, Wendy Wolfington, Mike Abney, Allen Hurst et al to talk about the next BarCampBCS I originally thought. We did do that eventually, but along the way we talked about several issues near and dear to my heart, namely localism, continuous improvement, and community development. I've always seen a link between one's ability to make a difference in one's own community and how well one does one's own job. The idea being: if I do a good ...
I have a copy of the "Principles behind the Agile Manifest stapled to my cube wall (http://www.agilemanifesto.... One of my favorite principles is : "Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely." To me this principle promotes work life balance and leads to less burn out and developer attrition. As our economy weakens I find myself working weekends and into the wee hours. Is this sustainable ...
I've known Jason pretty much since I moved up to Minneapolis, although I had heard of him long before that via his books and the Magenic tech lists. In addition to being a total languages geek, Jason's a pretty interesting guy with an eclectic background and a broad set of interests... it's probably why we get along so well. He's also a busy community guy, so I'm glad he was able to spare a few minutes to knock out this interview. So here it is, NINE Questions with Jason Bock: 1. Where are you from ...

 

This weekend I received an email from one of my blog’s readers asking my how to search for content on my blog. To be honest, my first reaction was to wonder why someone would ask me such a silly question. But then I thought on it and realize that I didn’t know the answer, but I was pretty sure that Google could do it. For the few of you that watched the video that Microsoft produced where I answered some questions that were asked of me off camera, I said that the most important tools that a Platform ...
I finally got a chance to run NDepend against a code base I'd written and I gotta tell you, it was an eye opening experience. First of all, I'd recommend spending some time reading about static code metrics first. Patrick Cauldwell's book is a good resource to start with. He has a chapter about static code analysis and he explains it at a high level in a very simple way. The NDepend website also has some excellent resources on understanding your NDepend analysis output. they have screen casts, which ...
Last I attended a TFS User Group meeting in Minneapolis. Bill Maurer explained how Microsoft used Team Foundation Server to build the next release of Visual Studio. It was really interesting to hear how the development team used TFS to track their own work. The most interesting thing to me was to hear about how TFS is being used to manage Java projects (Not at Microsoft of course!) Previously it had not occurred to me to consider TFS as anything other than a .NET development tool. But, of, course, ...
I recently went to my cousin's birthday party (he turned 6), and since he's apparently become a huge Star Wars fan (read: played LEGO Star Wars and loves shooting off C-3PO's leg), my parents decided to get him a couple small Star Wars LEGO toys that were designed for that age group. They're small - maybe 30 pieces or so - but they're still pretty neat, and I can't help but be amazed at how the pieces still come together to form the whole. I was a LEGO and K'nex fanatic when I was younger, but I ...
MPUG Monthly Meeting - The Power of Scrum Microsoft Office Project Users Group website: www.mpug.com Please join us on August 28, 2008, 12:00 - 2:00PM. Jay Steffenhagen from ITR Group will present: The Power of Scrum This Lunch and Learn will introduce Scrum development as an Agile method. An overview of the Scrum process and roles; advantages / disadvantages of Scrum; tailoring opportunities of Scrum SDLC; and Scrum's relationship to Project Server will be provided. The session will conclude with ...
Is it really that important? I've seen too many applications meet their end because people got caught up in the tripe. I've personally lost development time to "Go back and use that font" or "Make it that color blue instead". In my personal experience, managers and customers (and it gets worse as you go higher up the food chain) defer to you on all the really important stuff but try to meddle in the details. Just say no! This happens for two reasons: People like forcing demonstrable change on the ...
It's always an honor to be asked to speak at an event. Fortunately John Kellar who chairs the Nashville devLink event hasn't heard about my reputation, lol. One of the many things I'm passionate about is software startups. Since I haven't had a chance to talk about this subject in a while, I'm really looking forward to it. If you have ever thought of or intend to start your own software business, then please attend. I guarantee it'll be one of the most engaging talks you've experienced. Here's a ...
Leonardo da Vinci, when he painted Il Cenacolo, or as we call it here in the US, The Last Supper, produced studies for the work before he began to paint. Later, when the painting was restored in the 1970s, researchers used infrared reflectoscopy to look underneath the outer coats of paint to find that the original work of art was in fact very different from what tourists had seen for the past few generations - mostly because of the poor showing conditions for the painting, but partly because Leonardo ...
improve my => 'code' One of the interesting features of Agile development is the regular feedback created by the methodology. Continuous builds, especially when they show graphically when they are broken or have failing unit tests, give Agile teams a sort of self awareness about the health of their project. Many Agile projects even give visual cues regarding the health of the project for instance showing the health of the build through the use of traffic lights (green for good, red for broken). ...
Today I'd like to talk a bit about requirements and end users as its all related to the software development lifecycle. So first, the stages. Over the years there have been many different stages defined, at varying degrees of granularity. Wikipedia has a good definition. As developers, we tend to hang out in varying stages of this lifecycle, depending on the size of our company (for me, I hang out in specification, architecture, implementation, and maintenance -- we have a relatvely small company) ...
Although I was more-or-less lambasted for my post about free vs. open source software, I want to follow-up with a comment or two about .NET development. There is a common misconception that developing for Windows using .NET is an expensive endeavor. For the record, .NET development is free. .NET Framework SDK The .NET framework itself (a.k.a. runtime) is completely free. In fact, if you don't have it, go and download it right now. Check out "Get the Framework" on the right. http://msdn.microsoft.com/e... ...
Vmware currently is going through the wars. A change of CEO, a plunging share-price and a competitor getting alot of attention with their new product, that being Microsoft with Hyper-V. However, I just don't get it!? ESX Enterprise is still out in front in terms of features and pricing is very competitive. Any organisation performing their own unbiased product comparison evaluations is going to be hard pushed to discount Vmware's flagship product. The killer feature for many is ofcourse Vmotion that ...
Technical Software Project Management is Dead I’ve manage projects, I’ve lead them, I’ve been a developer, I’ve tested, I’ve organized releases, I’ve done all the paperwork. It’s just that lately, that seems to be the role expected from the developer on any given project. Don’t get me wrong, project managers are great. I still have never hired, fired, had to argue for the budget. Yikes! All these things have nothing to do with actually building the software. However, try developing something with ...
Software development satire

In software development, communication is key. Here's a popular email forward describing the reality of software development and the miscommunication prevalent.
I first met Rachel at TechEd 2008 and have been following her Twitter feed ever since. She's a newly awarded ASP.NET MVP, ASPInsider, Microsoft Certified Trainer and one seriously cool geeky chick. You can find her blog at www.RachelAppel.com. Fortunately for you, dear reader, she was able to squeeze these NINE Questions into her busy schedule. Enjoy... 1. Where are you from? I’m from Northeastern Pennsylvania. I was born, raised and remain here, only to escape during my frequent travels. 2. Who ...
Nowadays program and hardware adaptation to take advantage of dynamic changes in behavior is becoming increasingly important as a result of technological trends. The requirement for co-existence is essential for any language claiming to be general purpose. Subsequently, the service agent manages communication between a business assembly and an external Web service. Consequently, A composite service is atomic in nature, but orchestrates the invocation of component services into a business level process. ...
The Twin Cities Developers Guild is having their first meeting (and kickoff cookout) tomorrow evening (Tuesday, July 8, 2008) at New Horizons of Minnesota. The cookout begins at 5pm and the meeting begins at 6pm. Come out and have a burger or brat with us and stay for our featured speaker (see below). If you can't make it this month, be sure to catch next month when we'll have Rocky Lhotka introducing CSLA Light (CSLA in Silverlight.) All we ask is that you RSVP to developersguildevents@gmail... ...
Do the Twin Cities really need ANOTHER .Net User Group? There are two answers to that question. The first is YES, we think so. The second is that we aren't a typical .net user group, even though we focus on Microsoft Technologies. We use the term Developers Guild to imply more than just a roomful of folks sitting around listening to someone talk. Our objective is to bring the various special interest groups of the Twin Cities together and also provide our own events. We think you'll be pretty happy ...
How about doing a full regression of the system under development every ten minutes? Second Day Automation Testing One of the things I neglected to mention (on purpose) in my End2End post the other day was that you also test for the second day. In this test you are sending in new items and updating some existing items. You also leave some of the items from the first day completely alone to see what happens to them. This is done in the same way as the first, except you look for a second input file ...
I conducted a Webcast last week on Thursday, June 19th 2008, with Gunther Lenz. Some of you might have been able to make it. We had a great turnout for the event. Here's the info... Webcast Title: "Composite Rich Internet Applications" You can check out the Course Details at the following link: http://www.isvinnovation.co... Course Description: Join Microsoft’s Murray Gordon and Gunther Lenz for an informative webinar on the Composite Rich Internet Applications. ...
I have been tasked to give a presentation on technology tomorrow, to an audience which has not been exposed to software development and i'm wondering what i should talk about. My area is software engineering and technology as a subject is very wide, i'm limited to computer technology. Maybe i should talk about new computer devices, or probably some new things the C#2008 with .NET 3.5, or maybe some things i expect to use in the VS2008SP1? Oh... Its so difficult because my mind is mainly filled with ...
One of the questions that came out of my TFS talk at the Magenic Technology Summit was: How do you go about customizing one of the existing templates provided for TFS, such as MSF Agile? We may want to add new types for Work Items, for example, or add new states that work items can be in. The easiest way to do this is through the Visual Studio Team System 2008 Team Foundation Server Power Tools. If you do not have the Power Tools installed, you can still do this by editing the XML that makes up the ...
Microsoft Visual Studio is a really buggy IDE for ASP.NET development and it gets annoying at some point. A co-worker at the office has dubbed it 'Microsoft Buggy Studio'. I've seriously thought about switching to Java development where we have the likes of NetBeans and Borland JBuilder. What keeps me from doing that? Getting a job as a Java developer is a mission impossible in a city where pretty much all software development is based on Microsoft .NET or uses something like Oracle Forms.
Since Rocky and I happen to both be at the Magenic Technology Summit in Chicago this week, I managed to find some time to corner him and ask him NINE Questions. This means you, dear reader, get a bonus interview this week. This is my gift to you. 1. Where are you from? Aitkin, Minnesota. A small town with one stoplight and surrounded by a lot of great fishing lakes. 2. Who do you work for? Give me the 10 second pitch on them. Why would I want to buy their product? Magenic, probably the largest Microsoft-only ...