Tag | Software development Posts

Next week marks the first full week of June. Summer will feel in full swing and it will be a pretty big season for technology. In seeming acknowledgement of that very fact, both Apple and Microsoft will be holding large developers conferences starting Monday. Apple will hold its annual Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) in lovely San Francisco and Microsoft will hold its Tech Ed conference in muggy, oil-laden yet soulful New Orleans. A brief survey of each show reveals much about the differences ...
SharePoint 2010 Reference: Software Development Kit SharePoint 2010: Getting Started with Development on SharePoint 2010 Hands-on Labs in C# and Visual Basic SharePoint Developer Training Kit Professional Development Evaluation Guide and Walkthrough SharePoint Server 2010: Advanced Developer Training Presentations ...
Yesterday, Microsoft held its flagship launch event for Office 2010 in Manhattan. Today, the Redmond software company is holding a local launch event for Visual Studio (VS) 2010, in Brooklyn. How come information workers get the 212 treatment and developers are relegated to 718? Well, here’s the thing: the Brooklyn Marriott is actually a great place for an event, but you need some intimate knowledge of New York City to know that. NBC’s Studio 8H, where the Office launch was held yesterday (and from ...
Have you ever found that one book or resource that just brings it all home? Seriously. These are rare finds when you read the content and all the stars seem to align, you have those "Ah ha!" moments. Well, I have found that book and it is CLR via C#, Third Edition by Jeffrey Richter. If you're not familiar with Wintellect, look them up. This book is published by Microsoft Press and is the third edition of this title. I'm in chapter 5 at the moment and already I have a better understanding of the ...
I’m going to write my history with Agile here. That way, in future posts, I can refer back to it, instead of typing it out in the post that contains information you may actually want to read. Note that I’m actually a pretty senior developer, and do lots of technical interviews. I’m an Agile fan because of the difference it makes in peoples lives and the improvement in quality it brings, and I’ll sacrifice my technological advance to help teams. Management History I started management pretty early ...
Recently, on a software development forum, a person who shall remain nameless posted the following Hi, Is there good material available on the net/elsewhere for the following topics? 1. Transitioning an Organisation to Scrum 2. Scrum Team Dynamics Thanks Name Withheld to protect the guilty Of course one of the first answers the nameless one got was a link to LetMeGoogleThatForYou http://lmgtfy.com/?q=Transi... Here's a quick checklist to follow before asking geeks of ...
At the DDD8 conference in January I gave a quick interview to Sara Allison expanding my Commercial Software Development presentation (available here). The interview has just appeared on the Ubelly.com site, run by some of the Microsoft UK team, http://ubelly.com/2010/04/h... For those of you for whom video just isn't enough, you can get Commercial Software Development in person at DDDScotland and DDDSouthWest ...
I like Chicago. It is a great city for travellers. From the moment I got off the plane at O’Hare everything was easy. I took the train to ‘the Loop’ and walked around the corner to my hotel, Hotel Blake on Dearborn St. Sadly, the elevated train lines in downtown Chicago remind me of ‘Shall We Dance’. Hotel Blake is excellent (except for the breakfast) and the concierge directed me to a pizza place called Lou Malnati's for Chicago style deep-dish pizza. Lou Malnati’s would be a great place to go with ...
Seattle Code Camp was a two-day intensive software development conference. Ostensibly a technology agnostic event the reality is that code camp continues to focus on Microsoft technologies. Notable exceptions were talks on Ruby and iPhone development. If you were not able to attend you can view all of the sessions online. Code Camp was a good opportunity to catch up with my friends from last weekend’s Alt.NET conference and also to participate in some great sessions ...
Lately, I exchanged some arguments with Derick Bailey about some details of the red-green-refactor cycle of the Test-driven development process. In short, the issue revolved around the fact that it’s not enough to have a test red or green, but it’s also important to have it red or green for the right reasons. While for me, it’s sufficient to initially have a NotImplementedException in place, Derick argues that this is not totally correct (see these two posts: Red/Green/Refactor, For The Right Reasons ...
I realise that the topic above is likely not the most original but that’s best I could come up with. Apparently it is customary to use the first blog to introduce oneself so that’s what I’m doing here. My name is Anthony Jones, I live in a town called Halesowen part of what is known as the Black Country in England. I currently work for Union Square Software primarily with ASP.NET, C#, JavaScript and sometimes even Silverlight. I have been cutting code for the best part of 30 years (yes I do count ...
The two main concepts of Kanban is to keep the queues minimum and to maintain visibility. Management/leadership needs to make sure the Kanban Queue doesn’t get starved. This is key and also very challenging, being the queue needs to be minimal but also can’t get too small during the course of work. This is to maintain maximum velocity. Phases of the Kanban need to be kept flowing too, bottlenecks need removed ASAP when brought up. Victory Wall – I dig that idea. Somewhere to look to see the success ...
MVP in Virtual Machines Last week, on 1st April, I received an e-mail from Microsoft letting me know that I had been presented with a 2010 Microsoft® MVP Award for outstanding contributions in Virtual Machine technical communities during the past year. It was an honour to be nominated, and is a great reflection on the vibrancy of the UK user group community which made this possible. Virtualisation for developers, not just IT Pros I consider it a special honour as my expertise in virtualisation is ...
Asked by many of my colleagues often enough, I decided to take the plunge and begin blogging. After many attempts to start and long discussions about what I should write about, I decided to give my “buddies” a series of lessons and tidbits to help them understand what it takes to manage a software development project in the real world. Stories of success and failure to keep hope alive. I am formally trained as a developer (BS/CS) and have scattered my code throughout the matrix since 1985 (officially ...
Sorry for the rather lengthy post here. I get asked this all the time so I decided to post it…Visual Studio 2010 editions will be available on April 12, 2010. Product Features Professional with MSDN Essentials Professional with MSDN Premium with MSDN Ultimate with MSDN Test Professional with MSDN Debugging and Diagnostics IntelliTrace (Historical Debugger) Static Code Analysis Code Metrics Profiling Debugger Testing Tools Unit Testing Code Coverage Test Impact Analysis Coded UI Test Web Performance ...
Another March, another MIX. For the fifth year running now, Microsoft has chosen to put on a conference aimed less at software development, per se, and more at the products, experiences and designs that software development can generate. In all four prior MIX events, the focus of the show, its keynotes and breakout sessions has been on Web products. On day 1 of MIX 2010 that focus shifted to Windows Phone 7 Series (WP7). What little we had seen of WP7 had been shown to us in a keynote presentation, ...
This post is for those who want to apply or have already applied (but not finished the interview) for a Microsoft Job. The recruitment process is quite similar for everyone and consists of a few steps. Application E-Mail Interview Phone Interview On Site Interview I will tell you my story and how I went through the four phases. 1. Application My blog's title (Ex Nihilo Nihil Fit) means "Nothing Comes Out of Nothing". You can't get a job at Microsoft by not doing anything - this is true for anything ...
Since the dawn of the computer age, various methodologies have been introduced to improve quality and reduce cost. In this posting, I will by sharing my experiences with Test Driven Development; both its benefits and limitations. To start this topic, we need to agree on what TDD is. The first is to define each of the three words as used in this context. Test - An item or action which measures something in some quantifiable form. Driven - The primary motivation or focus of a series of activities (process) ...
Again, conversations give me a zillion things to write about. The recent conversation that has cropped up again is my various viewpoints of the Agile Manifesto. Not all the processes that came after the manifesto was written, but just the core manifesto itself. Just for context, here is the manifesto in all the glory. We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it. Through this work we have come to value: Individuals and interactions over processes and tools ...
[You might want to also read other GuestPosts on my blog – or contribute one?] On the 26th and 27th of March (2010) myself and Edd Morgan of Microsoft will be popping along to the Scottish Ruby Conference. I dabble with Ruby and I am a huge fan whilst Edd is a “proper Ruby developer”. Hence I asked Edd if he was interested in creating a guest post or two for my blog on IronRuby. This is the second of those posts. If you should stumble across this post and happen to be attending the Scottish Ruby ...
Surface is magic. Everyone using it seems to think that way. And I have to be honest, after working for almost 2 years with the platform I still get that special feeling the moment I turn on the unit to do some more work. The whole user experience, the rich environment of the SDK, the touch, even the look and feel of the Surface environment is so much different from the stuff I’ve been working on all my career that I am still bewildered by it. But… and this is a big but.. in the end we’re still talking ...
One of my major points of interest as a software developer is in the various tools that are available to make a developer’s life easier (or at least more interesting…). This is also a very important aspect for me in professional terms, because one part of my job lies in recommending suitable tools to my customers, implementing them and make them part of a developer team’s workflow. Thus, a well organized link collection is an important part of my assets and has a considerable business value for me ...
I'm here at PyCon 2010 in Atlanta. One of the pervasive themes (other than improving Python performance and testing which are very good pursuits IMO) is the recurring, omni-annoying "The Web is the New Operating System" concept that the .com busters (who failed us so miserably in the 90s) just love to espouse. The Web is a lot of things to a lot of people. If you asked 10 people what they thought "The Web" really means, you would probably get several very distinct answers, depending on their experiences ...
I’ve been finding myself working on too many things at once to be effective. Things get 80% finished and then either forgotten until an external stimulus reminds me to complete it or languish far longer on the ‘to do’ pile than they should. I’ve been doing a LOT of thinking / reading /experimenting with Kanban for software development teams. I am even attending a Kanban Coaching Workshop next week with David Anderson (@agilemanager). I have seen people tweet about “Personal Kanban” and thought this ...
Thanks to everyone who voted me onto the DDD8 agenda. It’s always an honour to have a topic voted into a conference by an audience of fellow developers, especially when it is a non technical topic such as this. I hope those who came enjoyed the session had a good time, and for them or those who were on one of the other tracks, or who couldn’t squeeze in; I’ve uploaded the presentation for you to download. I created a more simple, and smaller, PowerPoint without all the fancy animations and video ...
The area of computer science education is one that I have felt quite strongly about during my professional life. In the last 10 years, I have witnessed a number of projects where toiling through legacy code with legacy development habits was a normal and accepted way of working. However, it’s surprising that these kinds of habits often originate in university classrooms. This is where the debate over Software Carpentry comes into play. How can effective software development skills (such as producing ...
Most people - even the overwhelming majority of programmers - would say that the main activity of a software developer is "writing source code". But this is a (though quite understandable) misconception - and if you take a look at the available figures on the issue or if you - as a software professional - are honest to yourself, the misconception immediately turns out to be an enormous one. The world is full of software systems that are already in operation, and they have to be maintained - writing ...
www.prairiedevcon.com I am VERY thrilled and excited to announce a new Canadian software development conference scheduled for 2010: the Prairie Developer Conference! The conference will be held June 2 – 3 in Regina, SK at the Delta Regina Hotel and Conference Center. It will feature 40 sessions spread over 4 tracks: - Web and Rich Internet Applications - Development Foundation - Application Lifecycle Management - Database and Business Intelligence I’ll be announcing registration pricing later this ...
*Moved to: Solution - SEO permanent redirects for old URL’s?From time to time, your website structure may change. When this happens, you do not want to have to start from scratch with your Google rankings, so you need to map all of your Old URLs to new ones. This may seem like a trivial thing, but it is essential to keep your current rankings, that you worked hard for, intact.Read more...Follow my new blog on http://blog.hinshelwood.com ...
This is a new blog on the first day of the year starting a new decade. The world has changed in the last 10 years and the software development we did in 1999 is much different than the software development we did in 2009. In the same spirit, the next 10 years will see dramatic changes in the way we write software and the platforms that software runs on. Moving from compilers that targeted operating systems to targeting virtual machine platforms as mainstream software engineering was a dramatic change, ...
Wow, it only seems like just last week I was sitting at my PC trying to determine what I was going to concentrate on in software development for 2009. I had also just started the Frederick .NET User Group (FredNUG) in September 2008 and I was trying to figure out how to get speakers scheduled. Then, things started to quickly fall into place. My local INETA mentor, Frank La Vigne, provided me with a few names of well respected .NET MVPs who would most likely be interested in speaking at FredNUG. (Thanks ...
I consider myself extremely fortunate. I go to work everyday and do something I LOVE to do and I get paid quite well for it. Everyone should be that lucky. But about once a year I go through what I call, "Code Burn Out". I still enjoy what I do, I just don't come home and work on my own stuff. I don't spend all my time reading about software development and practicing to make myself better. I spend very little time on Twitter, and I don't even get on my computer very much after normal working hours. ...
*Moved to: Investigation - SEO permanent redirects for old URL’s?On the project I am currently working on we want to change the nasty http://northwind.com/produc... to a nice friendly URL on the website. This is pretty easy and can result in nice URL’s like http://northwind.com/produc... See Also – Solution - SEO permanent redirects for old URL’s?Read more...Follow my new blog on http://blog.hinshelwood.com ...
I was googling to find out some good details on Agile methodology, so that i can get understanding of it and can use the same in my coming project. While doing that I found some interesting links which I thought of sharing with you all Understanding of Agile (Practical Guide to Agile Methodologies) http://www.devx.com/archite... http://www.agilemodeling.co... http://scrummethodology.com/ http://www.agile-software-d... ...
The below repository structure is taken from a couple of sources and personal experience. Part of it is from the TFS Guide. Now don't dismiss it just because it comes from the TFS guide. It has great advice which applies to other source code repositories not just TFS. I am actually not a fan of TFS, prefering either Subversion or Git. Some of the structure also comes from Visual Studio Team System: Better Software Development for Agile Teams. <Root> /Development /FeatureBranchXName /<Branched ...
Welcome to my blog. My name is Carlos Santos and have been doing software development since 1996. I've been a solutions architect for various teams, done training classes, been selected from hundreds of MCTs to work at TechEd twice and developed and validated test for BrainBench. My goal here is to talk about the design tradeoffs I've faced during the development of existing and new systems. I'll be talking about various things, ranging from solution architecture (And the decisions at each of the ...
Technorati Tags: Application Architecture and Design Strategies Domain-Driven Design: Tackling Complexity in the Heart of Software The software development community widely acknowledges that domain modeling is central to software design. Through domain models, software developers are able to express rich functionality and translate it into a software implementation that truly serves the needs of its users. But despite its obvious importance, there are few practical resources that explain how to incorporate ...
Technorati Tags: Application Architecture and Design Strategies A lot of large scale software projects are unsuccessful. There is a poor communication between software architects, their managers, and other development team members. Often there is a poor architecture, projects become too complex. This creates a lot of unreadable "spaghetti code". These projects are very difficult to test and support. Often architects and development team are disconnected. What has to be done to succeed in large scale ...
I will formally announce that I have written some of the baddest [actually meaning worse, and not the venaculare where bad is really good] code in the universe. How do I know this? Because I have carefully studied the code I have written over the past 37 years (yes, since Sept 1972) and analyzed how it has fared over time. While there are only a few true "WTFs" [Worse Than Failure] , the majority of code in this category is code that I thought was excellent at the time of original implementation ...
Between work, life and umm... more work, I haven't really had much time for blogging *lately. (*for varying definitions of lately, the most accepted being "several months.") It hasn't helped that 99% of the random crap I usually spew onto this blog could apparently be summarized in 140 characters or less. Looking back, I guess Twitter damn near killed this blog. That and being **extremely sick over the last few weeks didn't help much either. (**Diabetes sucks, whether you ignore it or not. I've tried ...
Since starting at my job in 2008, I have had the pleasure of working with a mature, skilled agile development team. I am working with Thoughtworks employees, where Martin Fowler is the Chief Scientist. I've learned quite a few things from the people at Thoughtworks on agile methodology and the agile software development life cycle and just want to throw out my appreciation and the tip of my hat to these skilled people. Who said an old dog can't learn new tricks ...
I've seen a disturbing, yet understandable trend out in the software development market. Companies are starting to ask for PMP Scrum Masters. It's understandable because if you can just substitute one term for the other, then no one has to change their thinking on how software is delivered. It's also understandable, because if you describe the role of Scrum Master to anyone who has had the privilige to work for a great project manager, they can see that great project manager's work in the Scrum Master ...
A question I have for you is with all the focus on web or cloud-based applications (Silverlight, ASP.NET MVC, Azure, etc.) is there still a vibrant future out there for Windows Client desktop applications? Will Windows 7 do much to swing the focus back to desktop applications? Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying desktop based application development is dead, it’s not by a long shot. With development tools like WPF and ClickOnce deployment desktop applications still rock. I’m just saying that it appears ...
A new system programming language was recently released by Google and it goes by the name of "Go". According to Google, Go is still in experimental stage and it is an attempt to combine the ease of programming of an interpreted, dynamically typed language (such as Python and javascript) with the efficiency and safety of a statically typed, compiled language like C++. Go is mostly in the C family (basic syntax), with significant input from the Pascal/Modula/Oberon family (declarations, packages), ...
Had a short training on VMWare on Tuesday, the software development department finally got the official permission (read: get a license) to use VMWare Workstation. I’m no stranger to Virtual Machines (VMs) – started playing with Virtual PC 2005 a fwe years back and I understood the general concepts of hardware virtualization. The biggest problem I have with VMs in general is the slowness; I’d rather develop directly on my PC, which is faster. Can’t say I’ve delved deep into it, but I know enough ...
When doing software development the lean/agile way, you don't have much requirement documents produced upfront - and right so, because they tend to become outdated and useless within a couple of days, after the 'real' development phase of a project has started. However, a developer might occasionally write down some informal specs on the fly while he's coding. Personally, I often do this, when I'm implementing a feature that spans more than some minutes of programming time and is somewhat more complex. ...
Microsoft has released a new Facebook SDK Version 3.0 (other than their old not-so-great one) and it looks to have not just updated APIs but also wide range of features supported in many application types. Quoting a related blog post from c|net “The web services report” blog: http://news.cnet.com/8301-1... Microsoft on Monday released a software development kit for Facebook that allows developers to create Facebook applications for Silverlight and Windows Presentation Foundation. ...
From time to time (and when there's room for it, of course), I'm doing a so-called Code Kata, a small to mid-size programming exercise that usually originates from some seminar or meeting. (Kata collections can be found here or here, for example.) What I especially like about them is the level of professional self-knowledge that they provide: When working on a Kata, you can experience how you deal with things without the usual business pressure. Lately, I did the KataPotter (you can download my solution ...
I am practicing Test Driven Development (TDD) now for some two years or so, and soon this technique of writing software felt so natural, that I hardly could imagine doing it another way or even imagine a reason why I should do so. But on the other hand, I know that not questioning something anymore and not being self-critical from time to time is a certain recipe for running into a disaster sooner or later. So I asked myself: What makes TDD such a natural way of writing software? and What are your ...
I’ve taught a number of classes recently to people who are just getting started as software developers either as a way to change careers and move into our profession or just to people who love computers and want to learn more about how to program. I personally love these types of classes as they differ so much from the standard SharePoint or Silverlight type course where the average student is fairly skilled and the questions and interaction from students is very technical. In an introduction type ...