Tag | .NET Framework Posts

Last September while I was working on my Teach Yourself Visual C# 2010 in 24 Hours book for Sams Publishing, I posted some interesting statistics for the .NET Framework 3.5 SP1. Now that the .NET Framework 4.0 has been released, I thought I would update these statistics (and thanks to Lisa for asking about them). There were a total of 44,346 types (loaded from 130 assemblies), with 33,152 classes, 2,398 interfaces, 4,828 enums, and 8,796 value types. The complete breakdown is shown below. Of the ...
I’ve been very “heads down” working on my upcoming book from Sams Publishing, Teach Yourself C# 2010 in 24 Hours, so I haven’t been blogging as much as I usually do. In doing some research for the book, I’ve been taking an in-depth look at the .NET Framework and thought I would share some interesting statistics. There are 18,435 total types in the .NET Framework 3.5 SP1, with 13,995 classes, 1,216 interfaces, 2,100 enums, and 1,124 structs. The complete breakdown is shown below. Of the 13,995 classes, ...
I just found these videos on ASP.NET for Team Foundation Server. I find that many developers new to .NET could learn a lot from these videos. Almost any developer could learn something or two from at least one of the videos. Check them out at let me know what you think. Team Foundation Server Training Videos Technorati Tags: ASP.NET,Team Foundation Server,TFS,.NET,.NET Framework,Training LiveJournal Tags: ASP.NET,Team Foundation Server,TFS,.NET,.NET Framework,Training del.icio.us Tags: ASP.NET,Team ...
Scott Guthrie[MSFT] announced the availability of .NET fx 3.5 library source code as promised. (Setup and how to use) Quote from the announcement: Specifically, you can now browse and debug the source code for the following .NET Framework libraries: .NET Base Class Libraries (including System, System.CodeDom, System.Collections, System.ComponentModel, System.Diagnostics, System.Drawing, System.Globalization, System.IO, System.Net, System.Reflection, System.Runtime, System.Security, System.Text, System.Threading, ...
One of the best ways to understand how the CLR works internally is to have a look at the SSCLI [a.k.a Rotor] source code. In How the SSCLI [a.k.a. Rotor] managed "new" works, I have used Rotor source code to discuss what happens behind the scenes when you use the managed new operator to instantiate a managed type, discussing implications of object size, how requests from multiple threads are handled, the different validations that are done, when out-of-memory exception is thrown, etc. If you are ...