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Peter Stathakos - Stack Of Toast Microsoft, .NET and Life in General

Thanks to Gunnar Kudrjavets, a software tester at Microsoft, for a link to a great article named They Write the Right Stuff from Fast Company. The article is a great look at how the software for the Space Shuttle's computers is written and tested and the environment in which the On-board Shuttle Group works.

 

The points this group makes:

1. The product is only as good as the plan for the product.

- Plan out what needs to be done, document it and then begin to code.

2. The best teamwork is a healthy rivalry.

- Testers and developers try to outdo each other to find bugs, resulting in a better relationship and product.

3. The database is the software base.

- Detail all of the bugs found and understand how they got into the code in the first place. A bit of a “know your enemy“ mentality.

4. Don't just fix the mistakes -- fix whatever permitted the mistake in the first place.

- Once you understand how things went wrong, fix the process to ensure it does not happen again.

 

A very good read for any coder or tester.

Posted on Tuesday, June 22, 2004 2:03 PM | Back to top


Comments on this post: Writing and testing code for the Space Shuttle.

# re: Writing and testing code for the Space Shuttle.
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Wow, great read, different perspective from the norm. I have found a number of other 'different' perspectives at <A HREF="http://www.space.com/space-shuttle/">Space.com's Space Shuttle page</a> too
Left by starexplorer on Oct 24, 2006 4:10 PM

# re: Writing and testing code for the Space Shuttle.
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sorry, here's that URL:

http://www.space.com/space-shuttle/">Space.com Space Shuttle Page</a>
Left by starexplorer on Oct 24, 2006 4:11 PM

# re: Writing and testing code for the Space Shuttle.
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> A very good read for any coder or tester.
Not quite. Why so? Here is what one of the team says after being for a while in another company:

"Speed there was the biggest thing," he says. "The engineers would say, these are our top priorities, and we need to get'em as fast as we can." But the impression Larson got was that engineers didn't seem too concerned about how well the finished software actually worked. "Basically, they wanted quick software — just put it out the door."

So, where would "any coder or tester" find a place where speed is not the biggest thing?
Left by plamen on Feb 26, 2015 5:22 AM

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