Geeks With Blogs
Michael Crump Microsoft MVP, INETA Community Champion and XAML Advocate.

 

Introduction

One of the things that we all look at before we ship software is the performance of our apps. Last November, I posted a quick and easy way to do it in Silverlight. Today, I am going to walk you through doing it in Windows 8 for your Metro XAML applications.

After the Build event was over, I was interested in learning how to do this for my Windows 8 Metro Apps. I started watching videos from the Build RSS Feed and noticed this one from Tim Heuer that did just that.

Let’s get started

Click/Touch the “Developer Command Prompt” to begin. 

image

That will open a Developer Command Prompt. At the command prompt, simply type in “regedit” without quotes as shown below.

image

Add the Registry Key

Now, depending on the version of Windows 8 you have installed navigate and add the following key.

32-bit version of Windows 8

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Xaml]

"EnableFrameRateCounter"=dword:00000001

64-bit

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\Xaml]

"EnableFrameRateCounter"=dword:00000001

In my case, I was using Windows 8 64-bit. I had to create a new key called XAML and added a DWORD (32-bit) named EnableFrameRateCounter with a value of 1

image

image

Let’s test it

All you have to do now is to run any XAML / C# Metro Application.

image

Ok, so what do these numbers mean? Again, thanks to Tim Heuer for the nice slide.

image

You will notice that any application built using XAML / C# will display this framerate counter. Even the ones that ships with Windows 8. (For example: The Memories application)

image

What about HTML / JS apps?

It will not work with HTML / JS Metro Applications as I tried it. I think that is why the registry key starts with “XAML”. =)

image

image

Thanks for reading!

mike_new_avatar_thumb1_thumb Michael Crump is a Silverlight MVP and MCPD that works for Telerik as a XAML Evangelist. He has been involved with computers in one way or another for as long as he can remember, but started professionally in 2002. After spending years working as a systems administrator/tech support analyst, Michael branched out and started developing internal utilities that automated repetitive tasks and freed up full-time employees. From there, he was offered a job working at McKesson corporation and has been working with some form of .NET and VB/C# since 2003.

You can follow Michael on Twitter or keep up with his blog by subscribing to his RSS Feed.
Posted on Wednesday, September 21, 2011 7:08 AM | Back to top

Copyright © mbcrump | Powered by: GeeksWithBlogs.net