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Lee Brandt's Blog You're only as smart as your last line of code August 2009 Entries
Community Credit Winnings
I am proud to announce, that I won a prize from Community-Credit in July. If you speak in the community, blog, help organize things or just attend meetings, go to their website and sign up and get your chance to win some stupid prizes. :0) ......

Posted On Monday, August 31, 2009 10:49 PM

Some Simple CSS Rules
OK. I am not a designer. However, a few years ago I was forced to get good at CSS and have gotten to the point that I feel confident I could create almost ANY look and feel using CSS and table-less design. There are some things that I do regularly to help me out. 1. Start at the top. Start with your master page and style that up really good. That will be your base. 2. Start with * { font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Sans-Serif; Margin: 0px; Padding: 0px; font-size: 1.0em; } It is at the top of almost ......

Posted On Monday, August 31, 2009 10:41 PM

Sharp Architecture Presentation at Kansas City DNUG
Well, I crashed and burned tonight. I knew the information, but I had one small problem, that kept my demo from working. I added the SchemaNameConvention to the Data project for handling database schemas, and added it to the Fluent NHibernate conventions list. I SHOULD NOT, however, have changed the code for getting the Id of the domain objects. What this does, is it looks at the object and determines, by domain signature attributes, which property mappings need to be mapped as an Id not a property. ......

Posted On Wednesday, August 26, 2009 12:21 AM

Kansas City .Net User Group Meeting for August 25th, 2009
Speaker Lee Brandt is a Senior Consultant with Adventure Tech Group, Inc. in Overland Park, Kansas. He has been programming professionally for over 10 years and developing solutions in .NET and C# since the early beta releases. He is an advocate for behavior-driven development, design patterns and agile methodologies. Topic Getting Started with S#arp Architecture ASP.NET MVC is all the rage lately. There are also several peripheral projects that compliment ASP.NET MVC development (MVCContrib, NHibernate, ......

Posted On Monday, August 24, 2009 6:15 AM

Finally Learning Expression Design
I have been using the Expression Studio 3 for only a day or two, but I have played with Expression Studio 2 before and was frustrated with Expression Design. Let me first say, I am NOT a designer, so I am not familiar with Adobe Photoshop for image editing either. The limited image manipulation I have done has been in Paint.NET. I’ve never had a problem putting a drop shadow on some text, until I tried to do it in Expression Design. Last night, however, I figured it out. So I put some text on an ......

Posted On Saturday, August 15, 2009 5:10 PM

JQuery Kicked My Hiney Today
I didn’t leave work until 8PM this evening. I was wrestling with a JavaScript/JQuery problem and it became a personal battle to bend this application to my will. (Maybe in some future post I’ll talk about how horrible that is.) So I didn’t get it before I left, but I came home and started hitting it here on a test project. There seems like there are probably some scripting conflicts in our project (we have the JQuery stuff and prototype in there), so it didn’t take be but about a half-hour at home ......

Posted On Friday, August 14, 2009 1:33 AM

Sorry for the Silence
I realize I have been quite quiet lately. This is due to three main things: One, I started a new job with AdventureTech Group, Inc.. I am consulting again, and I am liking it much more this time around. AdventureTech is an awesome company and everyone I’ve met has been outstanding. All the developers are top-notch and I can’t wait to get a chance to learn from all of them. Second, I’ve been preparing my presentations for the St. Louis Day of Dot Net. I am totally excited about going to St. Louis ......

Posted On Thursday, August 13, 2009 2:53 AM

Let He Who Is Without Sin…
We’ve all done it at one point or another. We’ve all looked at some code we were left by another developer and thought, “WTF was this guy thinking?!?” We tend to automatically assume that the developer before us was a complete amateur. These kind of developers give us all a bad name. It’s absolutely no wonder that clients don’t trust us. With code like this, who could blame them for thinking we are all hacks. The problem is, the customer never reads our (or their) code. If the customer has any inkling ......

Posted On Monday, August 3, 2009 9:54 PM

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