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Today is the first real conference day at Tech*Ed Europe.

The day started with the traditional Keynote, always a good indication of how Microsoft sees the future.

Of course there was, like we are used to by now, the .net and longhorn evangelizing.
Microsoft really has a hard job convincing the world that they are right.
After years of evangelizing, .net is still not really catching on with the developers.
But with Longhorn, of course, this will all change: We will no longer have a choice. We will have to go .net.

But there were other things than the evangelizing. There was also lots of talk about the upcoming Visual Studio 2005.
Microsoft seems to be integrating new competitors for lots of existing third party tools into visual studio.
There has already been the SourceSafe effort, to provide version control. SourceSafe has never gained much credibility, because the folks at Redmond don't use it themselves, and it is not considered reliable. But it is helping small companies out with giving them an easy way to work more or less like bigger and more professional companies.
In the upcomning Visual Studio 2005, there will be tools like BoundsChecker, TrueTime and TrueCoverage integrated into Visual Studio.
All of these are of course introduced as if nothing like it has ever existed before.
I expect the same to happen here: Large companies will not use them, because they want to stick with the established names, which they know to be good.
But it's great that the smaller companies can now also use such tools, which will increase their software quality.

Microsoft also seems to be very much interested in the small, beginning software developer.
Their express products are targeted at these people, making it cheap and easy for them to have good software development tools.
Microsoft will lose money on these products, but it seems like they hope to recover this money later when the beginning programmers have grown up and stick with Microsoft products, now that they are used to them.

Microsoft is also catching up with shareware, having trial versions of many products available, and marketing them the same way shareware companies do.
Are they actually learning things from us?

At 12:30 the exhibition has officially started.
There have not been so many people here yet, but I am expecting the big rush in a few hours, when the meet and greet is being held.
Even with not so many people here until now, it has certainly already been worthwhile to be here.

This kind of visibility is very good for the ESWC, to which we invite you all!

If you are attending Tech*Ed Europe, please come say hello at booth A42 (next to Ask The Experts), where we will gladly explain all about the European Shareware Conference, and demonstrate that shareware can be very good and professional.

Posted on Tuesday, June 29, 2004 2:18 PM Shareware | Back to top


Comments on this post: Tech*Ed Amsterdam: Day One

# re: Tech*Ed Amsterdam: Day One
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>>After years of evangelizing, .net is still not really catching on with the developers.

This is like saying that Windows hasn't really caught on. Seriously, if you're going to post something like this, you should really look up a couple of stats first so you don't look stupid.

>>Microsoft will lose money on these [Express] products,

How so? They've already developed the technology. They just throw together a scaled back IDE and bingo, a new revenue stream.

>>Microsoft is also catching up with shareware

They've had trial versions of many of their products for a long time now. This is nothing new.

Have a great time at the conference and I wish you all the best with your upcoming Shareware Conference. It sounds very interesting.

dave
Left by David Totzke on Jun 29, 2004 2:56 PM

# re: Tech*Ed Amsterdam: Day One
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Hi Dave,

Re:
This is like saying that Windows hasn't really caught on. Seriously, if you're going to post something like this, you should really look up a couple of stats first so you don't look stupid.

The developers here at Tech*Ed all seem to be programming in C#.
But the average programmer has still sticked with Visual Studio 6.0.
It's not a coincidence that Microsoft is still bringing out service packs for a product that is so old.
Right now .net seems to be used mostly for web server development.
The problem is that most developers find the price of havint to distribute the framework too high.
I expect things to change with longhorn.
But as long as the framework is not installed on desktop computers by default, most programming will not be .net based.
By the way, we were asked by Microsoft to find some applications that were web based. We asked all our contacts, but could not find any. Which is where I get the impression that it's still not catching on.

Re:
How so? They've already developed the technology. They just throw together a scaled back IDE and bingo, a new revenue stream.

As far as I know Microsoft is using money on Visual Studio as it is.
But they don't care.
They want programmers to use Visual Studio so that they can develop good Windows software.
I think that Microsoft expects no profit from the express versions at all.
It is not new for them to loose money on a product that fits their strategy.
And they can afford it.
Since you're most likely a software developer yourself, I think you know that the cost of developing a product, even a strip-down of an existing product, is easily underestimated. I'm sure Microsoft has a whole team working on every express product, and the development is not like you describe it at all.

Anyway, I'm just giving my impressions here, nothing that should be regarded as the absolute truth.
Left by Henk Devos on Jun 29, 2004 4:30 PM

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