Geeks With Blogs
Evan Koch Musings on BizTalk Server and SQL Server
One of the things Microsoft introduced with BizTalk 2006 is failed message routing. Prior to this, developers had to come up with custom solutions to remove failed messages from the messagebox to prevent them from accumulating. Now all one has to do is enable routing for failed messages on the receive ports and create an orchestration to consume these ......

In one of the previous examples that talked about convoys within BizTalk, I had the following orchestration:In one of the previous examples that talked about convoys within BizTalk, I had the following orchestration: The purpose of this map within the orchestration was to receive a message that followed the Claim schema, transform it into the ClaimValidation ......

Taking decoupled orchestrations one step further, we’ll use it to do multiple concurrent tasks and then associate the output from those tasks. We’ll borrow our scenario for this example from the health care industry. When a claim is submitted, there are multiple types of validation that happens (and by no means is this a comprehensive list): is this ......

Using multi-part messages is first in Marty Wasznicky’s article 8 Tips and Tricks For Better BizTalk Programming so I thought I might demonstrate this technique in more depth. My experience with multi-part messages has been when I want to define a single message to pass among loosely coupled orchestrations that contains all the messages associated with ......

One of the things I’ve found useful in Biztalk development are debug statements. True, you can use the orchestration debugger and view the values of messages as the orchestration runs, but it can be a good bit easier to have the orchestrations write debug statements when they reach certain points. To accomplish this you can put calls to System.Diagnostics.Debug.Wr... ......

I checked my blog this morning only to find that the images were missing from the last five or so posts I had made.  Not quite sure what happened, but I've uploaded the images again.  My apologies to anyone who read a post recently and was unable to view the images, but they should be there now.

Recently I've wanted to demonstrate using the BizTalk Rules Engine outside of BizTalk. In our post 9/11 world, everyone's probably had some contact with the heightened security and restrictions for air travel and banking transactions. Along the same lines, the Nuclear Regulations Commission often updates the rules concerning access control to nuclear ......

Considering the last post concerned loosely coupled orchestrations, I thought it might be useful to demonstrate tightly coupled orchestrations. This method still can promote reuse as orchestrations can be called from multiple sources. We’ll use the same loan process diagram. And here’s the layout of the master orchestration. In this case we don’t have ......

At its heart, BizTalk is based on the publish/subscription model. As messages come in to the message box, BizTalk checks to see what orchestrations have subscriptions that match the criteria of the incoming message. This pub/sub model is opens up a new paradigm for developers in terms of programming. For this example we’ll use the following process ......

While this isn’t exclusive to BizTalk assemblies, I can’t say I’ve had much need for strongly named assemblies prior to working with BizTalk. When a BizTalk assembly is deployed, the assemblies are installed into the GAC. For an assembly to be installed into the GAC, however, the assembly must be strongly named. It’s easy enough to create a .snk file ......

Copyright © Evan Koch | Powered by: GeeksWithBlogs.net