Justin a.k.a. The Code Monkey

Code Monkey [kohd muhng'-kee] n : 1. Creature known for it's ability to transform caffeine into code. 2. Justin Jones
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.Net 4.0

Variations on a Repository Pattern: Part II
In my previous post I laid out my current pet project and began showing the framework I set up to isolate CSLA business objects from the data access code. I listed (sans code comments for brevity) the static factory class and interfaces for a data access abstraction. You can find this post here: http://geekswithblogs.net/T... Now I need something more concrete to the project at hand. Still without any concrete implementations, ......

Posted On Sunday, March 24, 2013 7:14 PM | Comments (1) | Filed Under [ .Net 4.0 ]

Variations on a Repository Pattern: Part I
Ok, Let’s try this again. <ObligatoryIShouldBlogMo... Skip='DontCareJustShowMeThe... Way back when I decided to blog more often because, well, mainly someone told me I should. That didn’t work out, but I still like Scott Hanselman’s idea as a blog as a place to keep cool code ideas. Well, he says that’s why he started the blog anyway. As an aside, he also says you should maintain your own site and own your own content. I’m working on that, and already have a cool domain name picked ......

Posted On Sunday, March 24, 2013 2:06 AM | Comments (2) | Filed Under [ .Net 4.0 ]

Remember way back when we had a free decompiler?
I, like probably so many of the rest of you, was mortified when Reflector was sold to RedGate. I knew where it was going. Suddenly you had to install it instead of just download and run it. I had a deep down feeling that one of the most useful tools in my arsenal was about to become a corporate product and no longer belong to the world of free tools. Sure enough it did. For a while now I’ve limped by without my favorite decompiler. This was made a little easier by the fact that you can now debug ......

Posted On Saturday, September 15, 2012 1:59 PM | Comments (2) | Filed Under [ .Net 4.0 ]

How to write your unit tests to switch between NUnit and MSTest
On my current project I found it useful to use both NUnit and MsTest for unit testing. When using ReSharper for running unit tests, it just simply works better with NUnit, and on large scale projects NUnit tends to run faster. We would have just simply used NUnit for everything, but MSTest gave us a few bonuses out of the box that were hard to pass up. Namely code coverage (without having to shell out thousands of extra dollars for the privilege) and integrated tests into the build process. I’m one ......

Posted On Saturday, September 15, 2012 1:17 PM | Comments (2) | Filed Under [ .Net 4.0 ]

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