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Dynamic Concepts (in) Development Musings of TheCPUWizard

I will formally announce that I have written some of the baddest [actually meaning worse, and not the venaculare where bad is really good] code in the universe.

How do I know this? Because I have carefully studied the code I have written over the past 37 years (yes, since Sept 1972) and analyzed how it has fared over time.

While there are only a few true "WTFs" [Worse Than Failure] , the majority of code in this category is code that I thought was excellent at the time of original implementation (and was even reviewed by peers). Yet, over time it was proven that an alternate approach (which was considered and disarded) would have proven better in the long run.

This is the "silent killer" of the software development world. Code that looks great, performs great, and yet still manages to incur higher costs over the entire lifecycle.

Do I have an answer for this? Unfortunately, "Not Really"!  Yet I am 100% convinced that code in this category costs the industry significantly more than truely "bad" code.

The first step to addressing this issue is the implementation of a rigorous process where "issues" are tracked, with a focus on determining the original conditions where the decision to choose a certain implementation was made.

I cahallenge all software developers to take a hard look at this aspect of their careers. Not only "What worked well over time?",  "WHY did it work out well?" but to also carefully look for the items where the code proved to be problematic over time.

Were decisions made..

  • To Early? (research "Big Requirements Up Front")
  • To Late?  (are you abusing "agile" development processes?)
  • With Insufficient Information? (how do you research and analyze requirements?)
  • Ingoring Inevitable Changes? (do you make assumptions about invaraibility?)
  • Without sufficient Skils? (what is your approach to learning new techniques?)
  • In too much of a Rush? (how much impact analysis is taken into account when developing a schedule?)

There are no simple answers, but I have consistently  found that when a developer or team carefully considers the above points, and has the support of management to make the necessary changes in process the cost of software development always decreases.

So spend a few minutes today and look back at the code you have developed. Ask yourself if when viewed from todqay's perspective you still think you write good code....

 

Posted on Thursday, December 3, 2009 9:18 AM A Look Back In Time , Developing Agile Software , Random Musings | Back to top


Comments on this post: Think you write good code????

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I will formally announce that I have written some of the baddest [actually meaning worse, and not the venaculare where bad is really good] code in the universe.
Left by Choline Chloride suppliers on Jan 06, 2011 9:12 PM

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