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Elton Stoneman
This is the *old* blog. The new one is at blog.sixeyed.com
July 2015 Entries
The Easiest Way to Get Started with HBase
You can run HBase in the cloud with Amazon’s Elastic MapReduce or Microsoft’s HDInsight, but for local development and testing you don’t need a full-on cluster backed by Hadoop storage, you want something leaner (and cheaper). HBase is pretty straightforward to install and run locally, using the native filesystem so you don’t need HDFS. You can run in standalone mode (where all the services run in the same Java VM), or in pseudo-distributed mode (where you have separate Java processes for Zookeeper ......

Posted On Monday, July 27, 2015 11:06 AM

Hey Azure, how's my Blob Storage doing?
This is the last one for the time being – how to get blob metrics for a Storage Account using the Azure Management Libraries, in the same way that I covered Cloud Services and Web Apps. Storage is different from compute in terms of what data is available, and what it is you want to see. I still want overall status and how hard the account is working, but instead of scale I want to see how much is being stored and how much the account is being accessed: The status block on the left tells me the name ......

Posted On Tuesday, July 14, 2015 11:25 AM

Hey Azure, how's my Web App doing?
This follows on from my last post, Hey Azure, how’s my Cloud Service doing? and it looks at getting similar metrics for Web Apps (née “Azure Websites”). Web Apps expose a lot of the same detail as Cloud Services through the service APIs, although the content isn’t exactly the same. Here’s how my dashboard looks with key details for one running Web App: The status block on the left tells me the website name (which would include the slot name if this wasn’t the primary slot), current status and the ......

Posted On Tuesday, July 7, 2015 12:19 PM

Hey Azure, how's my Cloud Service doing?
The Azure Management APIs give you a lot of useful stats and you can easily use them to build a customised dashboard for an instant healthcheck of your Azure estate. Documentation is a little sketchy though, so this is the first of (probably) many posts detailing how to pull stats out for different Azure services. First off you'll need a management certificate – see How to programmatically upload a new Azure Management Certificate – and the rest of this post is about getting information about Cloud ......

Posted On Friday, July 3, 2015 5:48 PM

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