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Elton Stoneman
This is the *old* blog. The new one is at blog.sixeyed.com

My latest Pluralsight course, Implementing the Reactive Manifesto with Azure and AWS has just been published!

I’d planned to do a course on dual-running a messaging-based solution in Azure and AWS for super-high availability and scale, and the Reactive Manifesto encapsulates exactly what I wanted to do.

A “reactive” application describes an architecture which is inherently resilient and scalable, being event-driven at the core, and using asynchronous communication between components.

In the course, I compare that architecture to a classic n-tier approach, and go on to build out an app which exhibits all the reactive traits: responsive, event-driven, scalable and resilient. I use a suite of technologies which are enablers for all those traits:

Starting with a couple of console apps to demonstrate message sending, I build the solution up over 7 modules, deploying to Azure and AWS and running the app across both clouds concurrently for the whole stack - web servers, messaging infrastructure, message handlers and database servers. I demonstrating failover by killing off bits of infrastructure, and show how a reactive app deployed across two clouds can survive machine failure, data centre failure and even whole cloud failure.

The course finishes by configuring auto-scaling in AWS and Azure for the compute and presentation layers, and running a load test with blitz.io. The test pushes masses of load into the app, which is deployed across four data centres in Azure and AWS, and the infrastructure scales up seamlessly to meet the load – the blitz report is pretty impressive:

image

That’s 99.9% success rate for hits to the website, with the potential to serve over 36,000,000 hits per day – all from a few hours’ build time, and a fairly limited set of auto-scale configurations.

When the load stops, the infrastructure scales back down again to a minimal set of servers for high availability, so the app doesn’t cost much to host unless it’s getting a lot of traffic.

This is my third course for Pluralsight, with Nginx and PHP Fundamentals and Caching in the .NET Stack: Inside-Out released earlier this year. Now that it’s out, I’m starting on the fourth one, which is focused on C#, and should be out by the end of the year.

Posted on Thursday, October 31, 2013 5:01 PM AWS , Azure , Pluralsight | Back to top


Comments on this post: Implementing the Reactive Manifesto with Azure and AWS

# re: Implementing the Reactive Manifesto with Azure and AWS
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I'm halfway through the course so far (at module 5 actually) and it is really very interesting. The quality is also excellent, well done! I just wish you would have chosen a less geeky title for the course, I'm afraid it will put people off.

I'll keep an eye out for your next course!

Steven
Left by Steven on Nov 18, 2013 8:45 PM

# re: Implementing the Reactive Manifesto with Azure and AWS
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Hi Steven, thanks for the feedback - glad you're finding the course useful.

I did have a couple of alternative course titles, but the course is about Implementing the Reactive Manifesto with Azure and AWS, so...

Next course should be out in December.
Left by Elton on Nov 19, 2013 1:00 PM

# re: Implementing the Reactive Manifesto with Azure and AWS
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Ive been reading in many places about the use of queues between the web and worker to increase scalability. Im facing a challenge to move an existing system (over 10 years old code) to the Cloud and this pattern appears to be one of the first to adopt for Cloud performance/cost reasons. If not by SignalR, how else does the (asynchronously initiated) worker report information on broken business rules back to the user ? The most common answer in the info ive come across is “by email”. While this works for Amazon, it wont work for the majority of business applications – the application should show them … somehow. Is SignalR the now preferred option - it would not be a broadcast but instead a response directed at a particular user eg "Your update didn't in fact work cos somebody put the record in a state that made your update illegal" ? Is it scalable and reliable enough to be used for this purpose ?
Left by Simon Dowdeswell on Dec 13, 2013 12:13 AM

# re: Implementing the Reactive Manifesto with Azure and AWS
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Code for your course - is it up on github anywhere would love to dig through it in depth

Cheers
Gregor
Left by Gregor Suttie on Jan 05, 2014 9:55 AM

# re: Implementing the Reactive Manifesto with Azure and AWS
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Hi Gregor,

you can download all the course materials (slide decks & source code) from Pluralsight under the Exercises link: http://pluralsight.com/training/Courses/ExerciseFiles/implementing-reactive-manifesto-azure-aws.

You'll need a Plus subscription though.

Elton.
Left by Elton on Jan 05, 2014 10:03 PM

# re: Implementing the Reactive Manifesto with Azure and AWS
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Hey Helton,

This course has a public repo on github ?! I would like to analyze some pieces of your code
Left by Rafael on Jul 19, 2014 1:41 PM

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