James Michael Hare

...hare-brained ideas from the realm of software development...
posts - 136 , comments - 1095 , trackbacks - 0

My Links

News

Welcome to my blog! I'm a Sr. Software Development Engineer in Seattle, WA. I've been doing C++/C#/Java development for over 18 years, but have definitely learned that there is always more to learn!

All thoughts and opinions expressed in my blog and my comments are my own and do not represent the thoughts of my employer.

Blogs I Read

MCC Logo MVP Logo

Follow BlkRabbitCoder on Twitter

Tag Cloud

Archives

Post Categories

Visual Studio

There are 9 entries for the tag Visual Studio
Visual Studio Little Wonders: Quick Launch / Quick Access
Once again, in this series of posts I look at features of Visual Studio that may seem trivial, but can help improve your efficiency as a developer. The index of all my past little wonders posts can be found here. Well, my friends, this post will be a bit short because I’m in the middle of a bit of a move at the moment. But, that said, I didn’t want to let the blog go completely silent this week, so I decided to add another Little Wonder to the list for the Visual Studio IDE. How often have you wanted ......

Posted On Thursday, November 15, 2012 7:17 PM | Comments (6) | Filed Under [ My Blog Software ]

Visual Studio Little Wonders: Box Selection
So this week I decided I’d do a Little Wonder of a different kind and focus on an underused IDE improvement: Visual Studio’s Box Selection capability. This is a handy feature that many people still don’t realize was made available in Visual Studio 2010 (and beyond). True, there have been other editors in the past with this capability, but now that it’s fully part of Visual Studio we can enjoy it’s goodness from within our own IDE. So, for those of you who don’t know what box selection is and what ......

Posted On Tuesday, October 30, 2012 7:26 PM | Comments (6) | Filed Under [ My Blog Software ]

ANTS Performance Profiler
I’ve always liked Red Gate products. Reflector is a great tool for decompiling assemblies to see how something was constructed, and the ANTS Memory Profiler is an excellent tool for discovering sources of memory issues in your applications. So when I had a chance to really examine the latest ANTS Performance Profiler (6.3), I jumped at the opportunity to see how well it works. Background A performance profiler’s main job is to keep track of how much time is typically spent in each unit of code. This ......

Posted On Thursday, September 8, 2011 9:24 AM | Comments (5) | Filed Under [ My Blog Software ]

ANTS Memory Profiler 7.0
I had always been a fan of ANTS products (Reflector is absolutely invaluable, and their performance profiler is great as well – very easy to use!), so I was curious to see what the ANTS Memory Profiler could show me. You can check out more information about the profiler at Red Gate's web site at www.red-gate.com/products/d... Background While a performance profiler will track how much time is typically spent in each unit of code, a memory profiler gives you much ......

Posted On Thursday, March 10, 2011 2:55 PM | Comments (0) | Filed Under [ My Blog Software ]

C# Toolbox: A Debuggable, Self-Installing Windows Service Template (2 of 2)
Update: I have now placed the zip containing the source for the end result of part 1 and 2 of this service template here. Two weeks ago I began the series with a discussion on how to make a new C# Windows Service template that is “debuggable” (you can find the article here). I had then intended the next week to follow up with a discussion on how to modify that template to make the service “self-installing”. Unfortunately, with my work schedule I wasn’t able to complete the series last week due to ......

Posted On Thursday, October 7, 2010 4:43 PM | Comments (24) | Filed Under [ My Blog Software ]

C# Toolbox: A Debuggable, Self-Installing Windows Service Template (1 of 2)
Update: I have now placed the zip containing the source for the end result of part 1 and 2 of this service template here. I decided to write a pair of posts on making it easier to create Windows Services in C# (and in .NET in general). This is the first post that talks about how to make a Windows Service debuggable (the default visual studio template does not allow the service to be easily debugged), and then next week’s post will discuss making the Windows Service self-installing. Now, these posts ......

Posted On Thursday, September 23, 2010 5:59 PM | Comments (6) | Filed Under [ My Blog Software ]

C# Fundamentals: Parameters Passing Nuances
Last week I went into quite a bit of detail on C# struct (here) and the consequences of using a struct versus a class to represent complex data types. In the course of that article, I had a section describing the differences between value types and reference types and thought I would expand upon one of the ideas in there which seems to confuse some folks who are new to C#: parameter passing nuances. But first, let's lay the groundwork with some definitions: Parameter - the variable defined in a method ......

Posted On Thursday, August 5, 2010 6:18 PM | Comments (1) | Filed Under [ My Blog Software ]

C# Fundamentals: Beware Of Implicit Hiding
C# Fundamentals Genesis I’ve decided to begin a line of back-to-basics blogs that I hope to post regularly. I used to teach C++ Programming, Algorithms, and Data Structures courses at Webster University in the evenings here locally, and have missed those teaching and mentoring moments when I had to stop teaching after the birth of my twins (no more free time for me!). While some of these fundamentals will be obvious to those who know the languages well (I hope to post C# and C++ tidbits), I’m hoping ......

Posted On Thursday, June 24, 2010 6:11 PM | Comments (4) | Filed Under [ My Blog Software ]

C# Fundamentals: Optional Parameters - Pros and Pitfalls
When Microsoft rolled out Visual Studio 2010 with C# 4, I was very excited to learn how I could apply all the new features and enhancements to help make me and my team more productive developers. Default parameters have been around forever in C++, and were intentionally omitted in Java in favor of using overloading to satisfy that need as it was though that having too many default parameters could introduce code safety issues. To some extent I can understand that move, as I’ve been bitten by default ......

Posted On Thursday, June 17, 2010 6:11 PM | Comments (5) | Filed Under [ My Blog Software ]

Powered by: